My favorite pics of 2016


There’s a story behind each and every one but that would mean I’d have to write 9,000 words and I haven’t got it in me. Plus I cheated a little because a couple of these are montages. I did a lot more freshwater fishing this year than I have done recently. I’m sure there’s a reason for that. But basically I still love it and I’m loving that my daughter caught our biggest bass of the year. Have a great 2017 and many happy fishes.

Albie fishing story

I want to tell a story about the fish I’m holding in the picture from yesterday. (It’s hard to tell here but this one was over 18 lbs easy)

 

I’ve long been a proponent of using a Crease Fly when chasing albies cruising beachfront in water less than 15 feet deep. Often, you will see the fish crashing bait from a ways off, hustle over to where they are and the action will drop off as soon as you get there. It’s not that the fish have gone away, it’s just that they are moving around for another pass at the minnows. In this situation I will cast a Crease Fly even if the action has been done for a while. The albies are cruising in the shallows looking for something. The popping noise will bring up fish that are happening past. You know they are in the area, you just can’t see them. The strikes are pretty dramatic as the fish will roll over on the popper like Bruce the Shark rolled over on Timmy Kintner in Jaws. That’s what happened a few times on Sunday. Each time it was a surprise as I got hooked up when there were seemingly no fish busting and no action apparent. I guess the lesson here is persistence and to think outside the box of what other people might be doing.

 

Tale of tails


Got out on the high tide yesterday. It stormed like crazy all afternoon but it dropped off at just the right time. Chris and I dropped the boat in a likely spot and decided to wade. Didn’t take too long and we were seeing wavers. Chris got the first one he casted to and it was game on from there. We each caught two. We each missed a couple. Basically we were around fish for three hours. It was an amazing evening. Here’s a link to the video I made Redfish Tails

I hope you like it

Hot weather fishing

With all the fancy material to make fishing shirts these days I don’t wear much cotton when it gets hot. Recently I got a pocket T shirt from Marsh Wear and it was so comfortable out of the box that I just left it when we went out to a local bass pond. 


Oh yeah I also got one of their cool trucker hats. 


As you an see it was hot as an oven but we still caught a couple fish but more interestingly, even though I was sweating a lot, I never felt sticky or uncomfortable. It was then I realized there was something about this shirt. I had to check again to see if it was cotton. Yup. 100%. Great work guys. 

#marshwearclothing

Trip up north- fishing and stuff

I traveled to Syracuse last week to spend some Q time with my father. Overall intent of said trip was to spend a week at a lodge on a lake in Ontario. We definitely did that but there was other stuff as well. 

We hit some walleye on Oneida Lake. As well as picking at some bass around the shoreline 

I forgot how pretty pumpkinseed sunfish are:

I hit a small stream east of town. Not much was happening with the trout there but that does not mean I didn’t enjoy it.

Then we went up north to Fernleigh Lodge on Lake Kashwamakak (yeah I know, right). We got there in the middle of a heat wave but I managed to fool a nice largemouth on a 4 wt flyrod while poking around on the dock.

Then I settled into an early morning pattern with topwaters in the early morning and evenings and deep water fishing during the middle part of the day     

After a week we went back to Cuse and I had one magical evening on a creek west of Syracuse. I picked up some flies at Mickeys Tackle Shop in North Syracuse and put them to use that evening. I caught a bunch of trout on a size 16 Elk Hair Caddis and finished with this beauty 

I actually stayed below the Posted sign and dropped it under the low hanging branch.

Now we’re home waiting for the next redfish tide.